Tag Archives: olvar wood

Audubon

Last but by no means least of the great naturalists who forged a path for nature writing was John James Audubon (1785-1851). He was a colourful character, which is reflected in his illustrations and writings. The illegitimate son of a … Continue reading

Posted in nature writers, Nature Writing | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Ironbark (1)

Ironbarks, as their name suggests, are tough trees. Their outer covering is thick, rough and deeply furrowed. Dead bark is not shed but accumulates. As it dies, it is infused with kino, a dark red sap or gum. The kino … Continue reading

Posted in Nature Writing | Tagged , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Alexander Wilson: Father of American Ornithology

The second of the three great naturalists who influenced the development of American nature writing was Alexander Wilson. In 1794, aged twenty-eight, Wilson emigrated from Scotland, where he had been a none-too-successful weaver, reformer, painter and peddler and poet. Wilson scored a … Continue reading

Posted in Books, nature writers, Nature writing in the USA | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

William Bartram

Three early American natural history writers had a particular influence on the development of nature writing: William Bartram, Alexander Wilson and John James Audubon. As Romanticism shifted the emphasis from the physical qualities of the landscape to the feelings it engendered in … Continue reading

Posted in Books, nature writers, Nature Writing | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Woo-hoo: Powerful Owl

 When we first set up Olvar Wood, we kept hearing a deep mournful call carrying from far off in the early evenings, like a child speaking into a piece of poly pipe down near the large dams on the citrus grove below … Continue reading

Posted in Nature Writing | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Gilbert White’s A Natural History of Selbourne

Gilbert White believed that those who study “only one district are much more likely to advance natural knowledge than those that grasp at more than they can possibly be acquainted with: every kingdom, every province, should have its own monographer.”
Continue reading

Posted in Books, nature writers, Nature Writing | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Entlings

The ents may have lost their wives but I have found their children. The Entlings are a little on the small side but I have no doubt they will grow into something much larger. Exactly what, I’m not quite sure; there … Continue reading

Posted in Nature Writing | Tagged , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

hinterland

The word hinterland comes from the German hinderland, with the literal meaning of ‘the land behind’, usually the country behind the sea coast or a river, and traditionally, the port and city. In our case, we are behind the coast … Continue reading

Posted in Nature Writing | Tagged , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Lone Tree

Trees, like us, live not only in the present but remember the past and anticipate the future. The Larch, for example, remembers a caterpillar attack. The next year, it grows shorter, stouter leaves, which don’t photosynthesise as efficiently as its … Continue reading

Posted in Nature Writing | Tagged , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Falling Wood

The trees sometimes leave gifts for us at Olvar Wood: driftwood from the sky. Branches and fragments bleached pale grey and rubbed smooth not by the tumble of the ocean but by wind and sun and rain. They fall to … Continue reading

Posted in Nature Writing | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment